RFID Tracking Technology Is Keeping Your Kids Safe

RFID Tracking Technology Is Keeping Your Kids Safe

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Already college campuses throughout North America are experimenting with RFID technology as a means of keeping track of the whereabouts of their students, at least while on campus. With the ever-prevalent threat of theft and assault on college, as well as several infamous campus shootings in recent years, some colleges have squared away sizable budgets to keep track of their student body, moment-by-moment, in the event of a crisis or necessary evacuation. Most often, the RFID technology is implanted within a student’s official ID card, thereby giving added purpose to a longstanding college essential.

While RFID student tracking cards have yet to go mainstream on most college campuses, grade schools and high schools across North America – both public and private – are already beginning to take notice.  Everything from student attendance to valuable school assets is being taken into consideration as a possibility for RFID tracking. With RFID tracking, the rate of truancy among high school students could presumably be reduced significantly, especially in overcrowded school districts where student-to-teacher ratio is already at or beyond capacity. One Texas school district has already introduced RFID student tags in two of its hardest-pressed schools, and while statistics are as yet to be released, it seems likely that the measure for human error has been reduced significantly for school district teachers and officials.   

At Metalcraft, we are interested in applying RFID tracking technology to all possible venues and markets, and we can see the possibility (even the likelihood) of these tracking technologies being further introduced across the country from K-12 and beyond. We look forward to monitoring these developments as they unfold in national conversation, and we equally look forward to contributing our share to producing new technologies that keep our school systems that much safer and functional.